Fourth MHeNs Translational Neuroscience Lecture | 2019

Prof. Dr. Arn M.J.M. van den Maagdenberg, full professor and holds a Chair in Functional and Molecular Neurogenetics at the Leiden University Medical Center in Leiden, the Netherlands with affiliations at both the Departments of Human Genetics and Neurology.
Title: Migraine: from genes to models and mechanisms

Monday 2 September, 2019 

Lecture: 16 hrs. | Location: Jo Ritzenzaal: Oxfordlaan 55, Room 0.007
Drinks: 17 hrs. | Bandito Espresso

Short Bio

Arn M.J.M. van den Maagdenberg is full professor and holds a Chair in Functional and Molecular Neurogenetics at the Leiden University Medical Center in Leiden, the Netherlands with affiliations at both the Departments of Human Genetics and Neurology. He is a neurogeneticist and neurobiologist. He studied biology at the University of Nijmegen and received his PhD in 1993 at Leiden University for which he investigated molecular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in patients and transgenic mouse models. In 1998, he joined the Leiden migraine group and became professor in 2011. His genetic and functional research on various episodic neurological diseases (e.g. migraine and comorbid disorders epilepsy and stroke) covers the identification of gene variants (using GWAS) and mutations (using next generation sequencing) as well as elucidating their functional consequences. To this end he has generated and characterised transgenic mouse models that carry pathogenic gene mutations. More recently, he started using induced pluripotent stem cells as a means to generate human models of migraine. To ensure translation of basic science findings to the clinic he works closely with Prof. Michel Ferrari and Dr. Terwindt. The ultimate goal of the research efforts of the team is to develop newly prophylactic treatments for migraine.     

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Abstract

Migraine: from genes to models and mechanisms
Arn M.J.M. van den Maagdenberg, PhD
Departments of Neurology and Human Genetics, Leiden University Medical Centre, The Netherlands

Migraine is a common neurovascular brain disorder that is characterized by recurrent attacks of severe headache and neurological symptoms that include nausea, vomiting and hypersensitivity to sound, smell and light. Main migraine subtypes are distinguished based on the presence of an aura that is characterized as a wave of glial and neuronal depolarization that proceeds through the cortex and is thought to activate headache mechanisms, at least in those patients that also experience an aura. There is debate to what extent neuronal and vascular mechanisms are primarily involved in migraine pathophysiology. Using our transgenic mouse models that carry mutations previously identified in migraine we aim to dissect the underlying disease mechanisms, not only of migraine but also of the co-morbidities, such as epilepsy and stroke. We take advantage of the fact that similar clinical features are also seen with monogenic forms of migraine, e.g. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine (FHM) and Retinal Vasculopathy with Cerebral Encephalopathy with Systemic manifestations (RVCL-S), for which we have identified causal genes. Our research also involves genome-wide association studies, performed within our International Headache Genetics Consortium, to identify genetic factors in the polygenic forms of migraine and, more recently, started the use of human iPSCs to generate human cellular models.   

Participation is free, but please note that registration is obligatory.



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